Essay Book Enders

Both items had their low points, but the good and great essays and questions are well worth it.

Ender’s World is a wonderful collection of essays (solicited solely for this book - not that it’s a bad thing) and Q&As with Orson Scott Card.

He just wrote what felt right, but as time passed and the book rose to its Ender’s World is a collection of essays on Orson Scott Card’s classic, Ender's Game , which also features Q&As with fans, answered by Card himself.

The introduction is written by Card and over those pages, he carefully analyzes and explains what the story of Ender’s Game and the character of Ender Wiggins mean and mean to him.

Experience the thrill of reading Ender's Game all over again Go deeper into the complexities of Orson Scott Card’s classic novel with science fiction and fantasy writers, YA authors, military strategists, including: Ender prequel series coauthor Aaron Johnston on Ender and the evolution of the child hero Burn Notice creator Matt Nix on Ender's Game as a guide to life Hugo awar Experience the thrill of reading Ender's Game all over again Go deeper into the complexities of Orson Scott Card’s classic novel with science fiction and fantasy writers, YA authors, military strategists, including: Ender prequel series coauthor Aaron Johnston on Ender and the evolution of the child hero Burn Notice creator Matt Nix on Ender's Game as a guide to life Hugo award–winning writer Mary Robinette Kowal on how Ender’s Game gets away with breaking all the (literary) rules Retired US Air Force Colonel Tom Ruby on what the military could learn from Ender about leadership Bestselling YA author Neal Shusterman on the ambivalence toward survival that lies at the heart of Ender’s story Plus pieces by: Hilari Bell John Brown Mette Ivie Harrison Janis Ian Alethea Kontis David Lubar and Alison S. Schmitt Ken Scholes Eric James Stone Also includes never-before-seen content from Orson Scott Card on the writing and evolution of the events in Ender's Game, from the design of Battle School to the mindset of the pilots who sacrificed themselves in humanity’s fight against the formics Have you ever heard the rather disparaging English (as in UK) phrase 'to be an Anorak'? I didn't think so, so let me explain: An anorak is a person - usually male - who, while dressed in an anorak to protect him from the foul English weather, spends all his spare time sitting at the end of the runway at his local airport watching and noting - in painstaking detail - the comings and goings of all the airplanes. A whole book devoted to reading about how amazing Ender Wiggin is, what a natural born leader he is, how he fits into the Jungian hero mold, all the while being the classic Hero With A Thousand Faces. Ender’s World is a wonderful collection of essays (solicite First of all, Barnes and Noble, uh, the Young Adult section? I would understand if you placed it on both the YA shelves and the normal SFF shelves, but just the YA shelves? Unless you have new statistical data that a new crop of seventeen-year olds are going to be jumping up and down to read more essays about literature. Let me hit some highlights:“How It Should Have Ended” by Eric James Stone: The first essay in the book was just great. Stone talks about how most authors would have ended with Ender as the victor, reveling in new found fame and glory.

He then tells his friends (those who still have friends) about his finds, quoting Have you ever heard the rather disparaging English (as in UK) phrase 'to be an Anorak'? I didn't think so, so let me explain: An anorak is a person - usually male - who, while dressed in an anorak to protect him from the foul English weather, spends all his spare time sitting at the end of the runway at his local airport watching and noting - in painstaking detail - the comings and goings of all the airplanes. There is even a chapter extolling the value of him being short! I loved it and am grateful to the publisher for giving me the ARC to review. But no, Ender’s Game ends in emotional butchery and resurrection (hm, that actually describes it really well. Great essay.“Rethinking the Child Hero” by Aaron Johnston: This essay starts by showing how well the character of Ender meets the definition of the hero as outlined by The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Johnston then shows how Ender, as a child hero, breaks with the traditional passive child hero and instead brings about the mover and shaker child hero that is the standard today (Harry Potter, Katniss, etc.) Also a great essay.“Ender Wiggin, USMC” by John F.Because he realized that this story wasn’t just about a kid beating the odds stacked against him to create an elite team of soldiers, tricked into defeating a deadly enemy by willingly, but unwittingly sacrificing human lives – it’s a story about Ender Wiggins. But I will argue tooth and nail that it was necessary to show the path of the hero.There is no true victory celebration for a hero because the battle for him or her is always a Pyrrhic one.I was not previously aware that Ender's Game was recommended reading in some military circles.Also interesting on a more abstract level were the essays by people who saw Ender's Game as presenting a world view they agreed with.This should be a must-read for any writer who has read the series and wants to learn from the feet of the master storyteller how and when to break the rules. The introduction is written by Card and over those pages, he carefully analyzes and explains what the story of Ender’s Game and the character of Ender Wiggins mean and mean to him.He notes that none of this was in his head when he first wrote the short story decades ago.He then tells his friends (those who still have friends) about his finds, quoting registration numbers, engine types and each flight's punctuality. I share this with you because I'm an Ender's Game Anorak. I mean who else would have squealed with delight on seeing a book with the word Ender in the title on Netgalley? Did you know most successful people are below average height? Finally, if that wasn't enough magic, there are also pages and pages devoted to genuine Q&A with Orson Scott Card. As a writer, I learned so much as the contributing authors - bestsellers in their own rights like Neal Shusterman, Janis Ian and Aaron Johnston - dissected Ender's Game, exposing the nuances of OSC writing. If you're a writer - even if you don't write Sci-Fi - it will be well worthwhile reading this book, because you will come away with a new set of insights into our art. So to my fellow Anoraks out there, Ender's World is not to be missed. Schmitt: I’d always known that somewhere in the military Ender’s Game was required reading. Schmitt (who apparently is responsible for this required reading) explains exactly why. Not to take anything away from OSC, but this required reading is even more impressive given OSC’s relative inexperience with the military.And then, without bothering to read what it was about pounced on the mouse, clicked the request button, said a quick prayer that I'd be approved, all in less time than it takes most people to sneeze. But the final confirmation of my Anorak status came when I downloaded the ARC of Ender's World (Amazon) onto my Kindle. For an Anorka, what could be more amazing than getting into OSC's mind, seeing his motivations and the depth of his knowledge of his Enderverse? And you know what else, if that had been all this book was about, I would have been a very satisfied reader. First of all, Barnes and Noble, uh, the Young Adult section? I would understand if you placed it on both the YA shelves and the normal SFF shelves, but just the YA shelves? Unless you have new statistical data that a new crop of seventeen-year olds are going to be jumping up and down to read more essays about literature. OSC is an avid study of history, and, I guess, it shows. (I desperately need to find a new adjective.)“Ender’s Game: A Guide to Life” by Matt Nix: Mr. I’m not a close follower of the show (seeing as how I don’t have cable), but every time the show pops up on syndication, I watch it.It was only then that I discovered to my absolute delight that it's actually a book of essays about Ender and his world written by . It’s a great (darn it, there’s that adjective again! Okay, maybe not exactly, but that’s what it made me think of. Finally, in case the essays weren’t enough, you get some straight answers from OSC about a wide variety of topics. Ender's Game was published in 1985 and it is unquestionably a science fiction classic. In case you couldn’t tell from my opening paragraph, I think those best served by the book would be English teachers who teach the book (me) and those who really want to analyze Ender's Game through as many lenses as possible.

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